FOEA Emerging tech Project

FSANZ ignores evidence of nano titanium dioxide toxicity

According to a recent French peer-reviewed study, there are growing concerns that the use of nanoparticles in food is associated with an increased risk of chronic intestinal inflammation and cancer. The study found that consumption of food grade titanium dioxide (TiO2 – E171) containing nanoparticles caused pre-cancerous lesions in rats – raising serious questions about its use in food. The French Agency for Food, Environmental and...

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OECD nanomaterial dossiers of “little to no value” in assessing risks

A new study, commissioned by CIEL, ECOS, and the Oeko-Institute shows that most of the information made available by the Sponsorship Testing Programme of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is of little to no value for the regulatory risk assessment of nanomaterials. The study was published was published by the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) based in Singapore. IOM screened the 11,500 pages of raw data of...

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Common food additive linked to cancer and auto-immune disease

A new peer-reviewed study on food grade titanium dioxide (TiO2) containing nanoparticles confirms that that there are serious potential health risks associated with consuming these particles and they should not be permitted in our food. The study undermines the position of our food regulator – Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) – which continues to insist that there is no evidence that nano-titanium dioxide can cause harm...

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Webinar: What you need to know about nanotechnology and food

Friday, September 9, 6:30 am – 8:00 am (AEST) Register now While nanotechnology and nanomaterials may be tiny, they have huge human and environmental health ramifications. A growing body of scientific research demonstrates that engineered nanoparticles pose threats to human health, raising concerns about their use in food and many other consumer products. Despite these concerns, nanomaterials can be found in everything from baby formulas...

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Study raises concerns about the impacts of nanomaterials on plants

The first multi-generational study looking at the impacts of cerium oxide nanoparticles on plant growth has found that plants are more vulnerable to toxic nanoparticles if their parents were grown in contaminated soil. The study by Ma¬†et al. over three generations of plants found that exposure to cerium oxide nanoparticles lowered the quality of the plant’s seeds; slowed plant growth; and reduced yield and biomass. The offspring plants...

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