FOEA Emerging tech Project

FSANZ ignores evidence of nano titanium dioxide toxicity

According to a recent French peer-reviewed study, there are growing concerns that the use of nanoparticles in food is associated with an increased risk of chronic intestinal inflammation and cancer. The study found that consumption of food grade titanium dioxide (TiO2 – E171) containing nanoparticles caused pre-cancerous lesions in rats – raising serious questions about its use in food. The French Agency for Food, Environmental and...

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Nanoparticles implicated in heart disease

A new study has found a direct connection between the inhalation of nanoparticles and cardiovascular disease, once again raising serious questions regarding our increasing exposure to manufactured nanomaterials. The study which exposed human volunteers to gold nanoparticles via inhalation found that nanomaterials can move from the lungs to the circulatory system and accumulate in inflamed areas of the blood vessels. This finding was confirmed...

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OECD nanomaterial dossiers of “little to no value” in assessing risks

A new study, commissioned by CIEL, ECOS, and the Oeko-Institute shows that most of the information made available by the Sponsorship Testing Programme of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is of little to no value for the regulatory risk assessment of nanomaterials. The study was published was published by the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) based in Singapore. IOM screened the 11,500 pages of raw data of...

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Common food additive linked to cancer and auto-immune disease

A new peer-reviewed study on food grade titanium dioxide (TiO2) containing nanoparticles confirms that that there are serious potential health risks associated with consuming these particles and they should not be permitted in our food. The study undermines the position of our food regulator – Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) – which continues to insist that there is no evidence that nano-titanium dioxide can cause harm...

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US Government bans antimicrobial soaps – Australia should do the same

Friends of the Earth has welcomed the US Food and Drug Administration’s ban on antibacterial soaps containing ingredients such as triclosan because of evidence they can pose health risks, such as bacterial resistance. Louise Sales from Friends of the Earth’s Emerging Tech Project said “ the continued use of potent antimicrobials such as triclosan and nano-silver in consumer products is contributing to a crisis that the World Health Organisation...

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