FOEA Emerging tech Project
We don’t think it’s too much to ask

We don’t think it’s too much to ask

With your help we can campaign for FSANZ to adopt a safety first approach to food.

Another broken promise

Another broken promise

FSANZ fails to ensure the safety of foods containing nanomaterials

Emerging technologies and corporate control

Emerging technologies and corporate control

Read our special edition of FoEA's Chain Reaction magazine

Government’s deregulatory extremism puts public at risk

Posted by on Dec 19, 2014 in Featured | Comments Off

Government’s deregulatory extremism puts public at risk

We are surrounded by regulation. Every moment of our waking and sleeping lives is populated with a vast regulatory network. There are thousands of regulations relating to our homes, our clothes, our foods, the way we drive, the places we work, the wages we receive, the super we contribute to, the environment we live in and depend on for life. Many of these regulations have saved lives and protected property and biodiversity. But regulation in the extreme free market orthodoxy of both the ALP and the Coalition is now by definition bad....

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European MPs call for a moratorium on nano-foods while FSANZ does nothing

Posted by on Dec 3, 2014 in Featured | Comments Off

European MPs call for a moratorium on nano-foods while FSANZ does nothing

Members of the European Parliament’s Environment Committee (MEPs) last week voted for a moratorium on the use of nanomaterials in food until have undergone safety assessments by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). The European MEPs recommended “special attention should also be paid to food packaging containing nanomaterials, to prevent them migrating into food. And in line with the precautionary principle, all novel food should also be subject to post-market monitoring.” On the other side of the planet (although it feels like a...

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IPCC needs to rethink its embrace of unproven technologies

Posted by on Nov 27, 2014 in Featured | Comments Off

IPCC needs to rethink its embrace of unproven technologies

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) embrace of geoengineering proposals, which began very tentatively with the release of their fourth assessment report last year, is beginning to shape up as a dangerous romance. The IPCC’s 2014 Synthesis Report, released earlier this month, provides the strongest support yet from the IPCC for technologies intended to remove carbon from the atmosphere and allow carbon polluting business as usual. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is an extremely expensive, technically challenging and unproven...

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FSANZ fails to consider the safety of nanomaterials in food packaging review

Posted by on Nov 25, 2014 in Featured | Comments Off

FSANZ fails to consider the safety of nanomaterials in food packaging review

In a stunning example of regulatory capture and ignoring the precautionary principle when it comes to protecting human health, Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) has decided not to assess the risks of the chemical migration of nanomaterials into food because it doesn’t know enough about them. In a consultation paper for its review of chemical migration from packing into food, FSANZ argued that “the risks associated with CMPF [chemical migration from packaging in to food] from these packaging materials are not well defined and may...

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Nanomaterials in food packaging: FSANZ fails consumers again

Posted by on Oct 27, 2014 in Featured | Comments Off

Nanomaterials in food packaging: FSANZ fails consumers again

A recent Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) survey of packaging manufacturers and the food industry reveals that FSANZ is failing to protect consumers from the risks associated with the use of nanomaterials in food packaging. Nanomaterials are being increasingly used in food packaging – posing potential health risks – and yet to date FSANZ has taken no action to ensure these products are safe. FSANZ’s own summary of the responses to the survey, tabled in response to recent Senate Estimates questions, concludes that “the...

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