FOEA Emerging tech Project
Nanoparticles found in common food products

Nanoparticles found in common food products

Independent testing has found potentially harmful nanoparticles in a range of food products.

Common food additive linked to cancer and auto-immune disease

Common food additive linked to cancer and auto-immune disease

A new peer-reviewed study on food grade titanium dioxide (TiO2) containing nanoparticles confirms that that there are serious potential health risks associated with consuming these particles and they should not be permitted in our food. The study undermines the position of our food regulator – Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) – which continues to insist that there is no evidence that nano-titanium dioxide can cause harm when ingested. Food-grade titanium dioxide is approved as a white pigment (E171) in common foods...

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160 global groups call for a moratorium on gene drives

160 global groups call for a moratorium on gene drives

Cancun, Mexico – This week, international conservation and environmental leaders are calling on governments at the 2016 UN Convention on Biodiversity (CBD) to establish a moratorium on the controversial genetic extinction technology called gene drives. Gene drives, developed through new gene-editing techniques- are designed to force a particular genetically engineered trait to spread through an entire wild population – potentially changing entire species or even causing deliberate extinctions. The statement urges governments to put in place...

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GM techniques are potential WMDs and need to be regulated

GM techniques are potential WMDs and need to be regulated

Proposed changes to Australia’s Gene Technology Regulations would deregulate new genetic modification (GM) techniques deemed “weapons of mass destruction and proliferation” in the annual worldwide threat assessment report of the U.S. intelligence community. Several of the options outlined in the Office of the Gene Technology Regulator OGTR’s discussion paper released last week would leave dangerous new GM techniques such as CRISPR-Cas unregulated. If the OGTR deregulates these new GM techniques anyone from amateur biohackers – to...

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Webinar: What you need to know about nanotechnology and food

Webinar: What you need to know about nanotechnology and food

Friday, September 9, 6:30 am – 8:00 am (AEST) Register now While nanotechnology and nanomaterials may be tiny, they have huge human and environmental health ramifications. A growing body of scientific research demonstrates that engineered nanoparticles pose threats to human health, raising concerns about their use in food and many other consumer products. Despite these concerns, nanomaterials can be found in everything from baby formulas to candy to fertilizers, and are largely unapproved and unregulated by the government. Novel...

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Biohacking ban needed

Biohacking ban needed

US biohacker Ellen Jorgensen recently toured the country encouraging members of the public to genetically modify microbes prompting the GM Free Australia Alliance to call for a ban on the genetic engineering of microbes outside contained and certified laboratory facilities. Biohacking generally means genetically modifying a bacteria, yeast, plant or animal to change its function or physical characteristics. Whilst such tinkering currently appears to be legal in Australia, the development of new genetic modification (GM) techniques such as...

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